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Monday , May 28, 2018

ILO team assesses Yolanda’s damage in Negros

A TEAM from the International Labor Organization (ILO) has arrived in Negros Occidental to assess the extent of damage wrought by Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) and to determine the assistance they will send to the province.

Diane Respall, program officer of ILO-Manila, met with the officials of the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council at the Provincial Capitol on Monday.

“We are here to conduct rapid assessment especially on the impact of Typhoon Yolanda to livelihood and employment in Negros. This is our first day and we are gathering data so we have not yet drawn any conclusion,” she said.

Respall said they will compare their data with other ILO officials who are also doing the same assessment in other areas affected by the typhoon.

The ILO team will stay in the province for a week and will conduct assessment in areas hit hard by the typhoon in northern Negros, including the towns of Manapla, Toboso and Calatrava and the cities of Cadiz, Sagay, Escalante, and San Carlos.

Yolanda, one of the strongest typhoons on record, ravaged the Visayas last November 8, leaving scores of people dead.

"So from there we would determine the type of assistance we are going to give especially in terms of employment. Maybe emergency employment opportunities based on consolidated assessment because we have not yet determined the need," Respall added.

On Sunday, a team from Ireland-based international humanitarian organization Concern Worldwide also arrived in Negros Occidental to conduct a similar assessment and provide assistance to Negrenses affected by the typhoon.

Governor Alfredo Marañon Jr. accompanied chief executive officer Dominic MacSorley and emergency response coordinator Ros O’ Sullivan in conducting an aerial survey of the typhoon-hit areas in northern Negros.

Marañon said Concern Worldwide, which works with the poorest people in 24 countries, is evaluating what kind of assistance they may provide to Negrenses.

This could be through livelihood, shelter or typhoon-proof evacuation centers, he added.


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