University of the Philippines-Baguio implements ‘Carless Wednesday’

UP Baguio implements ‘Carless Wednesday’

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UP Baguio implements ‘Carless Wednesday’

Friday, August 04, 2017

THE first day of a once-a-week vehicle-free campus was implemented by the University of the Philippines Baguio (UPB) last Wednesday, August 2.

Dubbed “Carless Wednesdays,” this newly enacted university policy prohibits the parking of cars within the UPB compound for the rest of the day.

Chancellor Raymundo Rovillos said the measure was implemented to reduce the university’s “carbon footprint.”

By prohibiting the flow of cars within the campus once in an entire week, the university hopes to gain cleaner air within its surroundings. “Also by pedestrianizing the campus, we hope to encourage the UPB community to walk around,” Rovillos added.

“Carless Wednesdays” is one of the initiatives of UPB under an environment-oriented strategy called the “Green Campus” policy. Under the same guideline, even the posting of tarpaulin signs are now prohibited within the campus. Earlier, the university also banned the selling of bottled water, or even to bring them to school.

Instead, students had been urged to bring their own water bottles as water stations have been assigned at the canteen area should they need a refill.

The first-day implementation of “Carless Wednesdays” has been met with mixed reactions. While some were appreciative of the pleasant effect of an uncongested campus, others were annoyed that the rule also prohibits public utility vehicles such as taxicabs to ferry passengers within the campus.

“Resistance is expected, but people will get used to it eventually,” Dr. Rovillos said. He cited a previous policy to ban smoking within the UPB premises. “The resistance was fierce at first, but eventually this policy is now well in place,” he said. (Roland Rabang)

Published in the SunStar Baguio newspaper on August 05, 2017.

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