Thailand’s dried crispy lotus seeds to expand to Cebu | SunStar

Thailand’s dried crispy lotus seeds to expand to Cebu

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Thailand’s dried crispy lotus seeds to expand to Cebu

Friday, December 23, 2016

AIMING to showcase Thai cuisine and culture, TL Tradewinds Co. is planning to bring a distinctive snack treat to consumers all over the globe. It may be the first time one has heard of dried crispy lotus seeds. If one is thinking that it’s simply a water plant and not a snack, think again.

TL Tradewinds Co. has put out a unique twist in lotus pods or seeds of lotus flowers turning it into a delicious snack treat. Mai Dried Lotus Seeds, which is its brand name, has become very popular in its homeland Thailand. It is currently being exported to Singapore, Vietnam and Indonesia. It is set to export its products to Cebu. Mai Dried Lotus Seeds was recently featured as one of the Top 50 Gourmet Souvenirs Around The World by Conde Nast travel magazine.

“We’ve worked hard to develop this premium lotus seeds product which embodies Thailand and Asian cuisine. That’s why it’s no wonder that foreign tourists love to buy it as a souvenir to their loved ones abroad,” said Nitcha Tengprawat Le, founder of TL Tradewinds Co.

The inspiration for this snack was Nitcha Tengprawat’s trip to the market where the lightbulb went on: Why not turn the lotus pods into a delectable snack for people to enjoy?

“I began experimenting with a variety of local ingredients, and I met lotus pods at Surin market. I suddenly got an idea to produce a healthy snack from lotus seeds,” said Nitcha.

Inspired by Thailand traditional lotus seeds cuisine, the founder focused on developing lotus seeds that combine Thai traditional cuisine with modern food production.

Extracted from the lotus flowers that are grown widely in Thailand, it is turned into a healthy, guilt-free snack treat. The brand has proven that there’s more to the lotus flower than it seems to be. Usually, lotus flowers are used for religious and spiritual ceremonies and used as an ornament in temples and shrines due to its mystical attributes.Taking a bite of these dried lotus seeds will give one a delightful, exquisite taste of Thai’s rich cuisine.

Fresh from the lotus flower villages in Thailand, the all-natural premium snack of lotus seeds is directly sourced from farmers who plant, grow and harvest the lotus pods.

This company believes in giving back to the community. “I have always wanted to make a difference in the lives around me, and I see my business as a catalyst to allow me to do that,” said Nitcha.

With more consumers going for a healthy lifestyle, it is no wonder that dried, crispy lotus seeds are gaining attention and traction in the international market.

“Mai Dried Crispy lotus seeds are 100 percent natural and made from freshly-picked lotus seeds. It has no added sugars or corn syrup, and no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. It is a guilt-free snack with no trans-fat or cholesterol. They are also said to be a storehouse of nutrition. They are used very often in Asian traditional medicine,” said Nitcha.

She added: “Finally, consumers will not have to make the choice between what’s healthy and what’s delicious when it comes to filling the void between meals; our product is both healthy and delicious.”

Lotus seeds are also a rich source of protein, carbohydrate, calcium and high iron, plus very low fat. It has antioxidant properties with anti-aging components. It prevents cancer. According to Chinese traditional medicine, it can help protect one’s liver from harmful substances such as Aflatoxin which is believed to be the main cause of liver cancer. Furthermore, lotus seeds protect one’s kidneys, heart, spleen and joints from diseases. They also give a boost of energy naturally. (Contributed by Kat Caloso)

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu newspaper on December 24, 2016.

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