AMNESTY International alleges that police and assassins are paid P5,000 per user and P8,000-P15,000 per pusher killed. The government has denied the charge.

But compare the prices with what then mayor-elect Tomas Osmeña offered last May 2016: P50,000 for each drug lord, robber or criminal killed by the police “in line of duty.” Or what then president-elect Duterte offered last June 2016 for any drug lord killed in Cebu: P5.5 million.

Cheaper by the hundred.

Deaths recorded so far: 7,025 (from July 1, 2016 to Jan. 21, 2017) or an average of 34 a day. Do the math, at low-cost rates.

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ECONOMY OF DEATH

Check out these terms used in the program to kill pushers and users, as exposed by Amnesty International:

-- “informal economy of death,” which has allegedly benefited police, free-lance killers and funeral parlors;

-- “job order,” or the order to “liquidate” or “neutralize,” which comes “from a higher-up.”

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DEATH BILL WILL PASS

The House bill restoring the death penalty will pass not because legislators are convinced of the merit of the proposal (i.e. judicial execution deters crime) but because the majority will prevail. Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez has started cracking the super-alliance whip.

Look at his alternative (left)

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‘OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE’

A City Hall watcher says Mayor Tomas Osmeña should learn from the Supreme Court what “obstruction of justice” means.

On Dec. 1, 1989, Juan Ponce Enrile offered food and comfort in his house to then fugitive Ping Lacson.

He was charged with obstruction of justice. It would’ve fallen under that crime had the SC not considered it absorbed by the main charge of rebellion against Enrile.

Check out PD 1829: how could seeking a recommendation from suspended Bry. Ermita chief Imok Rupinta be, or even remotely close to, obstruction of justice?

TIP US OFF: TELL US ABOUT IT

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