THE Supreme Court of the United States recently announced that all of the country’s states must allow same-sex marriages. Prior to that, Ireland voted for the legalization of such union, and there are other European countries and other parts of the world opening to this history-defining milestone.

In the Philippines, of which basis for almost everything has to be US-based, the decision may create  ripples down to the country’s Constitution and Family Code.

For the supporters of same-sex marriage especially within the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) community, one reason why they are pushing for a union the same how 

heterosexuals (men and women) are solemnized because of its legal and conjugal binding that they will  enjoy – a civil right – and above all, like anyone who has the right to do so, is love.

However, since the beginning of the LGBT movement on same-sex unions,  and even on its quest for  equal rights, the topic itself goes unscathed with debates and lengthy, eternal discussions, of which  mostly anchored on religious contexts.

For obvious reasons, all religions of the world have stated in the teachings as written in holy scriptures  that same-sex unions and copulations  are considered  a sin or an abomination  to what God  intended for humankind.

In some considerate religions, having a homosexual feeling toward another is “harmless” until they consummate it through sexual relationship when it becomes sin.

Despite the attempts of separating the Church from the State, the lines remain blurred since religious beliefs are deeply rooted in the consciousness and formation of our societies, much so in the  Philippines, whether it is from Christian or Islamic communities.

Some advocates turn to science: the homosexual phenomenon is not just within the human beings, but  it has been present in other animals; debunking the theory that homosexuality is a disease and  contagious. But religions have separated humankind from the animal kingdom as being the likelihood of God and shepherds of the world.

I have met people who are LGBTs and I saw their imperfections as well as achievements in life. In fact, some of them are manlier or womanlier than any “straight” men or women because they accepted full  responsibilities when some people can’t or avoid facing heavier burdens.

Personally, it remains a mystery but I will leave these people and let time, or God, pass judgment on their fate. After all, we live in a world of interpretations, where the strong interpretations succeed in forming societies and cultures through the majorities.

However, there are tangible issues that human society has to pour its interest and energy:  discrimination still exists – not just on one’s  color, religion and cultural backgrounds. And the world  is going to the  extremes – not just on their view  of religions and liberal ideologies,  but also the  world’s climate.

In the next decade, we might witness a new world order. Should we be afraid or should we embrace it?

[Email: nefluczon@gmail.com]