OUR issue for the Easter anniversary is especially significant for our current column. We may recall our title in the previous week, which was the “Undying Easter Message of Hope.” For today, therefore, we highlight the special significance of the Easter message of hope in human life and which is also inspired by the historic Christian commemoration of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ that glorious Easter Sunday some years ago.

While we have already asked the crucial question of hope in the global era of crises today, we will more specifically highlight various notable cases of historic crises in our present days. We have already mentioned various historic cases confronting many countries today. As one example, historians have cited the United States of America, which despite its material wealth and military power, has been experiencing political and socio-economic challenges. Another example we also noted refers to the group of nations under the European Union (EU) as also beset by political changes with the withdrawal from the EU of the United Kingdom. As a result, the historic repercussions of these major changes are also affecting various areas of the world. Media has also reported other areas which are also besieged by various conflicts, political, economic, cultural and other challenges. These crises have also been affecting other states of Asia and Africa and even some countries of South America, which have also been adversely affected by similar manmade crises events including some major natural disasters.

With these various problems, the Holy Father Pope Francis and international agencies such as the United Nations have been calling for global responses for the millions of suffering refugees and migrants in these areas.

This is why we also pointed out that the various crises of today are connected with the lessons of history and in the process, we will share the vital role of the lessons of history to understand the present situation of the various possibilities to address the many crises and events in these counties.

We start today by pointing out the age-old lessons that history has taught in many countries of the world and thus learn how to cope with these perplexing difficulties and understand the causes of these events. In this connection, therefore, the values of the organizations under the United Nations are definitely possible solutions. This approach of multilateral understanding offers a practicable approach to the preference of some countries today, which would rather respond to problems in the more tedious complicated bilateral process of negotiations.

We will continue this discussion with more cases and suggestions involving the role of basic values and culture of different nations.

A blessed Easter to All!