THEY say the average life span of human beings is between 70 to 75 years old. So, when you are 50, you must have learned great lessons in life.

By having spent 75 percent of your life, you must have faced your fears, conquered your trials, and reconciled with your psychological baggage.

At 50, you must have appreciated life because you have seen some young people die; you must be smarter because your experiences brought you to where you are now; you must be kinder because you have witnessed how it is to live with pain and joy.

When you’re 50 in this era, you must have worked hard to live. Life becomes more complicated every turn of a decade.

But when you’re 50 and up, you always go back to the essentials. What is it that truly makes you happy?

After achieving your dream job and dream house, seeing your children turn into professionals or building their own family, discovering places on your bucket list, and trying out all kinds of dishes, what’s next?

As your brain functions more because of all the knowledge and skills you have accumulated all the years, this is the time to teach the young so when they grow old they would pay it forward.

We guide them to go back to the essentials of life. As the Little Prince puts it, “It is in the heart that one can see rightly. What is essential is invisible in the eye.”

And as they say, the best things in life are free – love, hope, humility, and kindness.

The next generation, even in the midst of technological advancement, will be reminded of the values that might have been forgotten and left unnoticed.

When we teach them, we allow them to increase while we decrease.

While this is a verse from John 3:30, “He must become greater; I must become less,” this can also be applied to matured people who want the next generation to be worthy of love and trust.

While this Bible verse is telling us that if we allow Jesus to be the Lord of our life, we are allowing Him to become greater, this is also true to parents, for example, who would settle for less to give more for their children.

Today, I am turning 50 and I am happy to have reached this age. I see fine lines under my eyes and wrinkled and dry skin on my hands, but each time I look at them, I am proud of myself.

This means I have conquered all the trials in life. Yes, life is difficult. This is the first line of Scott Peck’s The Road Less Traveled book. And this is true.

My fine lines, my sagging skin, and my not-so-energetic body are telling me that I am living life to the fullest and will continue to live that way until the end.

When you’re 50, you become so grateful to God for giving you such a beautiful life and family.

When you’re 50, you start to decrease while you allow others to increase. After all, you also had your time when you were up there.

When you’re 50, you just want a simple and less complicated journey. You have transcended from all the material demands of life.

When you’re 50, all you want is to be happy with your loved ones.