There’s actually more to President Noynoy Aquino’s anti-“wang-wang” cru-sade than forcibly stopping the inappropriate and illegal use of sirens in the streets.

It concerns two issues: rule of law and abuse of power.

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On this, there’s nothing more graphic than an oozing-with-self-importance government functionary using the “wang-wang” (siren) to flaunt his power and zooming through the streets unmindful of traffic lights.

Laws get disrespected and power is abused.

Laws

In this sense, law enforcers are correct in considering the “wang-wang” part of PNoy’s inaugural speech as a marching order and immediately roaming Metro Manila streets to seize illegally owned sirens and blinkers.

That’s a good starting point, especially if done on a nationwide and massive scale.

This means that authorities are finally giving respect to laws (PD No. 96 and RA 4136) long forgotten because these have not been implemented.

Consider:

“1…It shall be unlawful for the owner or possessor of any motor vehicle to use or attach to his vehicle any siren, bell, horn, whistle, or other similar gadgets that produce exceptionally loud or startling sound, including dome lights, blinkers and other similar signaling or flashing devices.

“2. The gadgets or devices mentioned above may be attached to and use only on motor vehicles designated for official use by the Armed Forces of the Philippines, National Bureau of Investigation, Land Transportation Commission, Police Departments, Fire Departments, and hospital ambulances.”

Change

But legality is one thing; flaunting and misusing power is another.

The anti-wang-wang crusade should therefore result not only in the upholding of the laws on the use of sirens and blinkers but also in forcing abusive officials to respect traffic rules.

Not only that.

The lessons culled from the campaign should be used to ensure that the overall goals enunciated by Malacañang, like restoring decency in governance, will be achieved.

The anti-“wang-wang” crusade, therefore, goes deep into what the PNoy administration’s theme of “pagbabago” is all about.