Shabu use may have prompted man to murder

THERE was nothing unusual during dinner at the Mangyao household in Napo, Carcar City last Monday.

Domingo had set the food around 7 p.m. He then called his brother Ranulfo’s wife to the table. “Mangaon na ta (Let’s eat),” Ranulfo quoted him as saying.

Two hours later, Domingo took his own life after he killed his brother’s two daughters.

Nagtuo ko nga epekto to sa drugas (I believe the incident was the effect of drugs),” Ranulfo told radio dyHP.

Ranulfo said they could never confirm if his brother was a junkie since the latter was never tested for drugs.

Domingo was also never caught with drugs although he was arrested last year after he held a relative captive. He was, however, released on probation last September.

Mental state

Ang amo lang mabantayan niya kay naay mga panahon nga maghinuktok siya (We noticed there were times he looked depressed),” said Ranulfo.

Domingo may have been hooked on drugs or was disappointed with his brother, leading him to commit the crime, according to Dr. Rene Obra, a psychiatrist.

The condition inside the jail may have also contributed to Domingo’s mental state, added Obra in an interview with radio dyHP.

The Dangerous Drugs Board stated the adverse effects of shabu include extreme weight loss, severe dental problems, anxiety, confusion, insomnia, mood disturbances and violent behavior, among others.

Obra said shabu increases dopamine in the brain, causing paranoia.

Dopamine controls physical movement, memory, alertness, attention, emotions and perception of pain and pleasure, according to livestrong.com.

A junkie who stops using drugs may suffer from withdrawal depression.

Social problem

“It will result to distorted thinking and action,” said Obra. “There are times they are responding to command hallucinations.”

In a hallucinatory state, the person thinks someone is directing him to kill someone.

Obra said the abuse of illegal drugs is a social problem, not just a medical one.

The police campaign and information drive against the perils of illegal drugs should be intensified, he said.

He said relatives should take active roles in the recovery of a junkie.

Usa ra atong utok. Wala niy laing replacement ug walay spare parts. Ampingan nato atong utok (We only have one brain. It has no replacement and spare parts. We should take care of our brain),” said Obra.

A similar incident happened in Catmon, northern Cebu on Oct. 5, 2014.

Eric Figues, a suspected drug user, stabbed his three children and mother-in-law to death before killing himself.

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