SECTIONS
Monday, September 23, 2019

DOH to tobacco firms: Move forward, follow health warning law

WITH the release of the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of the Graphic Health Warning (GHW) Law, the Department of Health (DOH) is calling on the tobacco industry to desist from any activities that will hinder its full implementation.

In an interview, DOH–GHW Law IRR Committee Chairman Alexander Padilla said it would be better if the tobacco industry will just follow the full provision of the law.

"Only that they implement the law in its letter and spirit. After a bruising challenge on both sides, the time has come to simply implement and forget about the past in order for all and the country to move forward," said Padilla.

On Thursday, the DOH finally released the IRR for the Republic Act 10643, which was passed with the aim of discouraging the public, with images of the adverse health effects of smoking, from continuing or starting cigarette smoking vice.

It came almost 20 months after the law was signed last July 15, 2014.

The IRR also comes in time for the start of the implementation of the GHW law on March 3 when no tobacco product packaging can be manufactured without picture-based warnings.

"This law is great for our health, most especially our youth, who, hopefully, would no longer venture a stick of cigarette as he grows," said Padilla.

To note, the IRR provides guidelines, rules, and responsibilities of all implementing agencies and persons involved in their implementation.

It also provides the technical standards and specific requirements in the production, sale, and distribution of cigarette packs with GHWs.

The IRR also listed down where the graphic health warnings must be printed on different kinds of cigarette packs:

· A standard pack of ten or twenty cigarettes must have its tobacco brand printed on 50 percent of its principal display panel (top half), while the graphic health warning (one image) must take up the other 50 percent (bottom half). Additional information must be printed on 30 percent of the pack's side panel.

· A long pack of cigarettes must have its tobacco brand printed on 50 percent of its principal display panel (top half), while the graphic health warning (one image) must take up the other 50 percent (bottom half). Additional information must be printed on 30 percent of the pack's side panel.

· A ream or carton of cigarette packs must have its tobacco brand printed on 50 percent of its principal display panel (top half), while the graphic health warnings (five images) must take up the other 50 percent (bottom half). Additional information must be printed on 30 percent of the ream or carton's side panel.

· A mastercase of cigarette packs must have its tobacco brand printed on its principal display panel, above a textual warning on the same panel (e.g. "SMOKING KILLS").

· A cylindrical case or tin of cigarettes must have its tobacco brand printed on 50 percent of its principal display panel (top half), while the graphic health warning (one image) must take up the other 50 percent (bottom half). Additional information must be printed on 30 percent of the pack's side panel.

· A round or disc-type case or tin of cigarettes must have its tobacco brand printed on 50 percent of its principal display panel (top half), while the graphic health warning (one image) must take up the other 50 percent (bottom half). Additional information must be printed on 30 percent of the pack's side panel.

· A wide box/case/shell of cigarettes must have its tobacco brand printed on 50 percent of its principal display panel (top half), while the graphic health warning (one image) must take up the other 50 percent (bottom half). Additional information must be printed on 30 percent of the pack's side panel.

Last year, the DOH already provided the tobacco firms the 12 templates that will be printed in the cigarette packs.

Included in the templates are images of people suffering from stroke, emphysema, mouth cancer, gangrene, impotence, throat cancer, neck cancer, as well as premature birth and low birth-weight of babies of smoking mothers.

Penalties for non-compliance of manufacturers, exporters or distributors range from P500,000 ($12,000) to P2 million ($48,000) in fine, or five-year imprisonment, and revocation of business permit. (FP/Sunnex)
style="display:block; text-align:center;"
data-ad-layout="in-article"
data-ad-format="fluid"
data-ad-client="ca-pub-2836569479021745"
data-ad-slot="1977900730">



style="display:block; text-align:center;"
data-ad-layout="in-article"
data-ad-format="fluid"
data-ad-client="ca-pub-2836569479021745"
data-ad-slot="4158864647">


VIEW COMMENTS
DISCLAIMER:

SunStar website welcomes friendly debate, but comments posted on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of the SunStar management and its affiliates. SunStar reserves the right to delete, reproduce or modify comments posted here without notice. Posts that are inappropriate will automatically be deleted.


Forum rules:

Do not use obscenity. Some words have been banned. Stick to the topic. Do not veer away from the discussion. Be coherent. Do not shout or use CAPITAL LETTERS!

sunstar.com.ph