UAE eyes 300 Filipino health workers

THE Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) disclosed Thursday that the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is in need of 300 Filipino emergency medical technicians (EMTs).

In a statement, POEA Administrator Hans Leo Cacdac said the National Ambulance Company in Abu Dhabi is looking for 300 Filipino health workers.

"Representatives of the medical service company are coming to the Philippines to interview qualified applicants on March 7 to 11," said Cacdac.

Qualified to apply are female or male applicants that are graduates of Bachelor of Science in Nursing, not be more than 45 years old, should have completed internationally recognized Basic EMT course or equivalent training with minimum of four weeks duration, and have at least eight months experience as EMT.

Applicants are advised to register at www.eregister.poea.gov.ph and personally submit at the POEA main office their detailed résumé with job description; high school diploma and Form 137; college diploma and transcript of records; valid BLS and BTLS certification; PSEMT or AREMT registration covering at least the last 8 months; letter of good standing from the registering body; updated letter/employment certificates showing experience as an EMT-B covering at least the last 8 months; colored copy of passport; colored copy of valid driver’s license; and two pieces 2x2 recent picture.

Meanwhile, the Department of Labor and Employment (Dole) reported an increase in the allocation for overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) for 2016 by South Korea under its Employment Permit System (EPS).

In a statement, Labor Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz disclosed that from the 2015 quota of 4,600, the Korean government has set a ceiling of 6,800, which is a 48 percent increase, for 2016.

"The higher quota of workers for South Korea is due mainly to our EPS performance, which has been consistently good," said Baldoz.

According to the Philippine Overseas Labor Office (POLO) in Seoul, Korea’s Ministry of Labor and Employment and Labor (MOEL) sets a maximum number of workers permitted from each sending country for manufacturing sector based on a set of criteria, which include the rate of illegal workers; employers’ preference; time required for sending workers to Korea; rate of workers’ change of employer; actual number of workers received in comparison to the ceiling set in 2015; and the country’s level of cooperation in implementing EPS policies.

Records from the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) show that there are around 46,000 OFWs that have been sent to Korea under the EPS program since 2004. (HDT/Sunnex)

style="display:block; text-align:center;"
data-ad-layout="in-article"
data-ad-format="fluid"
data-ad-client="ca-pub-2836569479021745"
data-ad-slot="1977900730">



style="display:block; text-align:center;"
data-ad-layout="in-article"
data-ad-format="fluid"
data-ad-client="ca-pub-2836569479021745"
data-ad-slot="4158864647">


VIEW COMMENTS
DISCLAIMER:

SunStar website welcomes friendly debate, but comments posted on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of the SunStar management and its affiliates. SunStar reserves the right to delete, reproduce or modify comments posted here without notice. Posts that are inappropriate will automatically be deleted.


Forum rules:

Do not use obscenity. Some words have been banned. Stick to the topic. Do not veer away from the discussion. Be coherent. Do not shout or use CAPITAL LETTERS!

sunstar.com.ph